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on in colorado, washington, and oregon. "washington journal" is next5. host: gorning, and welcome to the "washington journal." today is saturday, november 10. we begin this morning by looking at some stories regarding a statement that the president made yesterday in a speech addressing the nation, talking about claiming that the election gave him a mandate on taxing the rich. this is how it was reported in this morning's "new york daily news." they write "president obama claimed an election mandate to make the rich pay more in taxes, saying it is the will of the american people, making his first public appearance since his victory. obama said he would open talks with republicans next week on how to prevent painful tax hikes and budget cuts set to automatically take place effective january 1." we want to find out from you, your thoughts on the president's statement claiming that the election gave him the mandate or gives him a mandate on taxing the rich, agree or disagree. we've divided the phones in a little bit of a different manner this morning. 202-585-3880 for those making ove
's carriage accident and his return to washington, the famous state in which lincoln walks through richmond and then he returns to washington. the first thing lincoln does is go straight for the train station to see his friends who were in bed and seward wakes up and the two of them talk a while. seward cannot set up. in order to converse more comfortably, lincoln gets into bed with him, leaning on his elbow, and the two of them shot for an hour. >> how do we know? >> frederick's memoire, the son, and fannie seward, the daughter, kept a wonderful diary. >> he is 64. how old are his sons, augustus, frederick, and fannie? >> fannie is 19. augustus is late 20's. frederick, early 20's. >> they are young. what was the assassin's name? >> alternative names. lewis powell. late 20's. not more than that. a confederate veteran. a big man. 6 feet, 3 inches. it would have been army patrols immediately after the assassination. armed guards are around after, but no, no one protecting the secretary of state. some scholars think booth realized in the event of the debt of both the president and the vice pre
the tea party and the future of the republican party. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. i'm happy to be here. host: we've got an article here from the "christian science monitor" with the headline, "will the tea party compromise"" he writes, tea partiers may be more amenable to an agreement on tax revenues now that the electorate has signaled it doesn't especially like what the tea party has been up to. he goes on to say, if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, said speaker john boehner on yesterday, it's a mandate to find a way for us to work together. republicans, he said, are willing to accept new revenue under the right conditions to get a bipartisan agreement over the budget. your thoughts about what robert reich had to say and what the speaker is saying. guest: well, you know, i think that we need to find some common ground. obviously we're facing this fiscal cliff, so we have to find some common ground. everybody's talking about revenue, nobody's talking about cutting. that's really what we need to be focusing on, because you can tax people int
analysis with a white house reporter of "the washington post," and "bloomberg news." "washington journal"is next. ♪ host: what will a recollected administration do with a returning gop majority? what was the message of the election. leaders of both parties give us their take on that yesterday. we want to turn to all of you. your vote, your message to washington. we began with the front page of ."sa today, this is what richard wolf writes. the two sites listed no time sticking out their positions on the potential crisis that is 54 days away. this is what the two leaders had to say yesterday. we will start with harry reid and move on to john boehner. [video clip] >> they are tired of partisan gridlock. i have one goal, to be obama. obama was reelected overwhelmingly. republicans want us to work together. democrats want us to work together. they want to reach a balanced approach to everything, but especially the situation we have with the huge deficit. taxes are a part of that. >> the american people have spoken. they have reelected president obama, and every elected a republican
confidence. plus, your phone calls -- "washington journal is next. host: good morning on this friday, november 23, 2012. we begin overseas. the cease-fire between hamas and israel has held. in egypt, president mohamed morsi showed his authority yesterday. a startling port grab, freeing himself from traditional oversight. president obama followed through on an annual tradition of calling 10 service members to personally thank them for their service. the washington times and the new york times reporting there are now more state capitols dominated by a single party that than at any time since 1952. the washington times question, is this the answer, secure for gridlock? we'll get your answers. send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. also, you can e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the washington times for our question for all new this morning, there headline -- do you think this could be a cure for gridlock? the new york times also has this headline this morning -- we want to hear from you this morning. let me give you the phone numbers again. how d
. "washington journal" will be live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> two live campaign events today -- vice president and his wife jill can paint in lakewood, ohio at 11:15 a.m.. president obama and bill clinton and the battleground state of virginia -- they may bill final campaign stop at the jiffy lube pavilion in bristow, outside the nation's capital. this is about one hour. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause] >> hello bristow. >> hello. i am glad to be back in virginia. i want to thank congressman connolly. i want to ask you to make sure tim kaine wins this election on tuesday. [applause] it was great to hear the dave matthews band again. [applause] as you can see, i have given my voice in the service of my president. [applause] i have the honor of introducing the president tonight in setting up his speech. i want to tell you that four years ago when he ran both hillary and i worked very hard. we did together over 100 appearances. i am much more enthusiastic about barack obama's election tonight then i was four years ago. [cheers and applause] there are five simple reasons. first of a
partisanship as we go through this morning's newspapers on the "washington journal." which candidate or party do you think is best suited to reach across the aisle and work with the other side? for democrats -- for republicans -- independents -- there are social media ways to contact us as well. you can make a comment on our facebook page. that is up all day. or you can send us an e-mail. here is "usa today" this morning. their lead editorial -- that is "usa today" lead editorial this morning. a former democratic gov. of michigan writes this in "politico." of our first call up on this question of which candidate can best reach across the title comes from pittsburgh. good morning. caller: good morning. looking at yesterday, i believe president obama is a person i feel will work across the aisle. he has put silly politics aside and is looking at what needs to be done. he has worked at that very quickly and in his campaign. mitt romney it is still out there campaigning put them on a show. he acts like his supporters were donating. i feel like he will not work across the aisle for the whole unite
we will be joined by zachary goldfarb. our guests will also include alex gilb. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning and welcome to the washington journal. makers are in washington for the remaining weeks of the lame-duck session. the president is taking his ideas on the road to meet with the public. the white house says toy manufacturer is would be hard hit. republicans are planning meetings with small business owners across the country to force the president to back down on raising taxes on the wealthy. former florida governor jeb bush is gathering policy experts and dedication leader's fourth annual education summit. we covered yesterday's events pick. that's where we begin. mr. bush says the unions are barriers to better schools. how would you fix your school system? we want to get your take on it. also, send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with the "washington times headline" -- we want to show you what the former florida governor had to say at yesterday's event. [video clip] >> we need to have a teacher evaluation system
here. jobs are critically important, and i think if you take a look at what is wrong with washington, d.c. compan, there a long list of people. the jobs bill as a prime example that you brought up. it is interesting the gentleman i am running with is hyper partisan. he mentioned rosa, and she has gotten off hold of me and said he has not been much of the health on the subcommittee, and quite frankly, what needs to be done is people need to work together as americans. is when doesion thi politics trump jobs? is it when clean air or clean water is at stake or perhaps politics? >> the answer is jobs, and we need to create an environment in washington, d.c., where we are working together. we are trying to create an environment of working together. it is a political year. of course she is going to endorse the senator that best represents her local view, which is connected. >> senator, your turn. >> she did not endorse me. she just said what the record was. politics should never trump jobs. the problem was not wanting to invest in this country. clean water and clean air, it is a $3 billion in
a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, thank you for coming. please take this money and bring it back to washington. he said, go back to washington and tell them they need a reality check. we are tired of the overspending and the taxing and taking more money out of the economy. there are real challenges here. i used to live here. i worked and i lived over there. i understand. many businesses are hurting right now. regulatory tax uncertainty is the biggest challenge they have. >> tomorrow will be the one- year anniversary of senator brown's first vote against 22,000 jobs here in massachusetts. i hope everybody who knows someone who is unemployed, every business who would like
of being devastated, republicans in washington continue to play liberal games. they have turned the my way or the highway into my way or the runway. that is what is taking place. the federal aviation the administration has been bottled up now. this is the 10th day. we have lost about $300 million in revenue. i am pleased the senate seems to be willing to go further on some of this. the legislation that seems to be agreed to, which is the house version leaves out a big chunk,. the contract in jobs being held that have already been, there is little that is more important to job creation than these small airports. for my republican friends to continue to wreak havoc among the lives of those men and women, who are dependent upon these contracts in order to put food on the table, and in order for the ceiling over their heads, and prepare for a future for their children. this is unconscionable. i would hope we would hurry and get to the point of really setting aside political gains and start doing what is necessary to resolve these issues. the american people would like to see us resolve. let me
and republicans have to work together. that is what is needed in washington. that is how i have governed. that is the u.s. senator i will be if you send me and i have a chance to serve. >> thank you. >> thank you for watching. susan and i have been listening to the people of virginia. they want leaders to work together to get our economy back on the right track, create jobs, stocks washington spending, and restore the american dream. i want to be virginia's senator. tim wants to be president obama's senator. he went around the country giving partisan speeches. instead of staying home and dealing with economic crisis, tim chose to leave. on every significant issue, he has been for the obama policies that have been hurting virginians. from the harmful energy policies that are devastating communities, to our electric bills skyrocketing. obamacare that is endangering the access of medicare to our seniors. now, this sequestration deal is threatening another 200,000 virginia jobs. in washington, you deserve a strong, independent voice. if i have the honor of serving as your united states senat
to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the
is our guest. "washington journal" is next. host: federal officials including lawmakers on capitol hill are looking at how to slash wait times and possibly boost early voting. that will be hours subject for the first section of this edition of "the washington journal." for the first 45 minutes we will be talking to you about remedies to speed up the voting process. the numbers are on the screen. you can reach out to us by social media. @cspanwj. the conversation constantly going on on facebook -- facebook.com/cspan. we begin this morning with a look at the lead story in "the baltimore sun." pushed to speed of voting processes is the headline. he writes -- we want to find out from you, our viewers and listeners, your thoughts and remedies on speeding up the voting process. more from the article in "the baltimore sun." the article goes on to talk about a bill being proposed by virginia by senator mark warner. it says -- we would like to show you a little bit more about what the president had to say regarding voting lines and polling places. his thinking people and appreciating the time th
. ♪ host: good morning, welcome to "washington journal." the fbi investigation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus has expanded to general john allen. the impact of all this on the intelligence community and national security will be part of several hearings on capitol hill later this week. lawmakers return to washington today amid a shake-up of the president obama national security team, facing the looming issue of the so-called fiscal cliff. that is where we want to begin today this morning. president obama will meet later on with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not compromise on cuts to medicare and social security. what is your take on this? avoiding this -- avoiding the fiscal cliff? host: remember, you can send us a clear message, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. courtesy of the newseum, washington, front page of that newspaper and many of the newspapers this morning, including "the washington post," liberal groups prepare for an entitlement fight. this is what zachary goldfarb rights. -- writes. host: ther
hate politics and washington so much? >> she hated it because she was made fun of. the ladies of washington did not like the way she dressed, did not like how her hair was done. they thought she was a rube. after all, he did not gain acceptance -- he was shunned by almost all of washington and most of the senators because he came from a corrupt background. they let her now at one point that you do not wear seersucker if you are a first lady. she responded, what is wrong with seersucker? it was a series of incidents like that that made her hate washington. she would only stay there a minimal number of months in the year when harry was senator. even when he became president, she did not like washington. the grandson has been just put together a collection of letters he found in the house in books. he claims she loved being a senator's wife. i put that in the book -- the book was finished but i managed to get it in the notes. i did not find that she really enjoyed being in washington. so we have a conundrum. >> do you still live on lincoln road in lincoln, massachusetts? >> i sti
a possible review of the military drone strategy. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning. welcome to "washington journal." congress returns to washington with the clock counting down on time left to tackle the tough fiscal cliff and make decisions about taxes, spending, and budget cuts. states are looking at how they can be affected. a question for you this morning, whether states should have a say in budget talks. here are the numbers to call. if you can also find us online. here is the headline in "the new york times." the pew center has a new study out called "the impact on the fiscal cliff on states." here is what it says. we would do more into these and how they will specifically affect states on an individual basis. there is a question on whether the fiscal cliff would hurt. it says -- our question for you this morning is whether the states should have a stake of in negotiations. looking more in the story "the new york times." it says -- some of the benefits states could receive, nobody is retained that president obama and republicans in congress will fail to reach
>> as they returned to washington this week, some lawmakers from both parties were talking about compromise to avoid the january fiscal cliff, showing a willingness to put spending cuts and revenues on the negotiating table. the white house warned that the uncertainty of potential tax hikes for middle-class taxpayers could hurt consumer confidence during the holiday shopping session. that could have a big effect on the economy. the washington post writes that the white house is ratcheting up pressure to avoid the fiscal cliff. on c-span tonight, we will bring you some of the house and senate debate from august of 2011, when congress passed the budget control act that triggered cuts to take effect on january 1. we will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken o
battleground map we have been featuring for the last week or so here on the "washington journal." assuring the swing states in this election. this morning on the washington journal, we want to hear from the voters in the non-yellow states. everyone else in a blue, give us a call. we want to hear what you think about campaign 2012. our phone lines are open. we have already been getting a few comments on facebook. we want to start of christopher's from minnesota, he writes in, the electoral college needs to go away. john from maryland -- in other non-swing state writes -- my view is that the media has made too much out of the debates and hasn't focused enough of its energy on the ground with actual voters and personal stories. and finally, my goal from massachusetts writes, since my vote will not matter, have put my energy into getting democratic support for president obama when he is reelected, elizabeth warren for senate. we want to hear from those in non-swing states this morning. the phone lines are open. as we are waiting for you to call, i will point to the front page of usa today. the
that demographic shift. i remember when i came to washington. i remember writing an article for it -- remember that --public opinion magazine? >> yeah. i think you will see people start to write about a democratic electoral lock due to the changing demographics. we are seeing an electorate where the democrats are doing well among african-americans, hispanics, asians, younger voters, and white liberals. now that needle appears to have moved slightly to the democrats, so that if you have a kind of normal base election, the democrats have a very slight advantage. i think most people say we will continue to grow over time, unless the republicans do something to make inroads into some of the court demographics. if you look at the house races, you have to be cautious because the -- about the big message you are drawing. yes, the democrats gained what looks to me by my count about eight house seats. half their gains have to do with coming from illinois and california and are largely redistricting gains. but republican still control the house. what would you say was the democrats' message this electio
"washington journal" is live with your callswithtweets and emails, next. >> so, we asked them to look beyond the speeches, the attacks, and the ads. look to the record. because words are cheap. a record is real and it is earned with effort. >> we have come too far to turn back now. we have come too far to let our hearts grow faint. now is the time to keep pushing forward, educate all of our kids, rebuild our infrastructure, the stock -- discover new sources of energy, restore our democracy, and make sure that no matter who you are, no matter what you look like for where you come from, no matter your last name or who you love, you can make it in america if you try. [applause] ♪ host: president obama in virginia, before that was mitt romney in colorado as this last- minute campaign marathon continues, 48 hours before polls opened in much of the country. it is sunday, november 4. it is not just a presidential election, but the presidential races getting a lot of attention. virginia is the home to the most expensive race in this cycle. "60 minutes" will be looking at the senate,
into the driver's seat. by the way, i am not going to allow politicians in washington to control health-care choices women should make it by themselves. i am not going to do that. we are not going to go backwards. we are going to go for words. -- forwards. [applause] colorado, we know what change is. we know what the future requires. we do not need a big government agenda or a small government agenda. we need a middle class agenda that will reward responsibility. we need a common sense agenda that says when we educate a poor child, it helps us all, that says we donate suit science, her discovery will benefit all americans. we need an agenda that recognizes we do not just look out for ourselves. we look out for one another. we look out for future generations. we meet these obligations by working together. that is the change we need. that is what 2008 is about. that is why i need you to vote. [applause] let me be clear. achieving this agenda will not be easy. it will not be easy over the next four years. back in 2008, when we talk about change, i told you i was not just talking about chan
let me tell you what we're doing in mow hoe is what mitt romney is going to do in washington and get this country back on track again. [applause] it's really faith ladies and gentlemen and boys and girls, and by the way i've never seen so many young people at campaign rallies. and i'll tell you what i think it's all about. we as americans recognize we have two paths to choose. we've seen what the last four years gives us and it gives us more government that's inefficient and doesn't work very well. it gives us the possibility of even higher taxes. and there's a lot of reasons i hate higher taxes, the biggest reason is i know where that money goes in that city and it's time to clean it up down there. the last thing we need is higher taxes and regulators. instead of embracing the people that give people opportunity for jobs, they pound on us, they pound on small business people and stunt our growth. but we have another choice here tonight. and that's why there is so many people here tonight. you know it's about that american dream. you know government is not the answer. government is t
in washington published its. we have questions about this. there is a big concern about the ability of them to meet the challenges that have been laid out for them. there are concerns about technology. you said it is a pressure point. i think it is potentially a friction point. you're going to see more of that. i think states can use this as more opportunity to back out. >> in terms of more federal money, people said to us live all been talking about how there is a big squeeze. and 11 people feel like the money the department provided was not enough. there needs to be more resources. i do not see it happening. >> let's go right here. >> your discussion on the fiscal cliff is the conventional wisdom. they will find a way to build the bridge. i was the discussion yesterday where an alternative was presented. these numbers were saying that the fiscal cliff offers members of congress very difficult choices. nobody wants to vote for cuts to programs and entitlements and increasing taxes. there is a growing group that just my support growing over. they have the opportunity to do some positive thi
in september at the u.n., and now we have interesting results from two states here from washington state and from colorado. in addition to the many states -- i think there are 17 or 18 -- where marijuana can be used for medicinal purposes. in these two states, they can be used for recreational purposes. there we have the pressure from the region joined with some of the pressure and trends in shift in public opinion in the u.s., which i think will contribute an ad to greater pressure on the administration at the national level to rethink its policy on drugs, which is clearly having very negative effects are perceived to having negative effects in terms of crime, violence, and corruption in many countries in latin america. i think obama administration will probably say it has done some things to move forward on this issue, talking about shared responsibility, but i think despite some changes in the discourse, the essential elements of the policy have been pretty unchanged until now. again, this does open some -- possibilities. the reaction in mexico will be particularly critical to see whe
. your e-mails are live, next. of >> good morning.. the u.s. capitol after returning to washington for three days congress is out for the thanksgiving hall day, but back next week to work on the so-called fiscal cliff. the president in thailand. first stop in a three nation southeast asian tour and as part of the debate over the debt and government programs include social security, medicare and medicaid. aarp saying social security and medicare should not be cut as part of the debate over the 16 trillion over all debt. we'll get your thoughts our phone lines are open at (202) 737-0001 and (202) 737-0002 for republicans if you're an independent. (202) 628-0205, 3382 i'm sorry. headlines on this sunday morning. flames of rage. israel shoots down hamas missiles and we'll have more on this late in the program and the calculating the cliff. cover of cq weekly. republicans are talking about higher taxes as the president presses issue. and then there's this story from the "washington post". headline. aarp flexes muscle in debt talks the lo big power house for older americans last year mad
us. it will leave it there. and that is our show today on the "washington journal", and we will see you right back here tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. "washington journal >> here's a look at some of our lives programming. they're talking about the gun without cancer program. he concedes that live at 1:00 p.m. eastern. this will be like that three caught 30 p.m. eastern. later this afternoon we are back here for a speech by u2 lead singer bono. coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year began to sell off our debts and entitlement reform. it to be in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise and to ideas. i am committed to solving our fiscal challenges. i refuse to accept any approach that is not a balance. i'm not going to ask students and seniors to pay down the entire deficit with people like me making over $280,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the current congress still has work to do through the end of the year. work is e
-- [laughter] but the title is "miracle at philadelphia." and that is not wrong. washington, of course, was the presiding officer of the convention. the american constitution was by accident and design. the delegates -- the first month, would there be a president, would be a council, with the president have an absolute veto? at the end of the month, none of these things for resolved. at some points, at the delegates would say, the 18th century equivalent of we are out of fear. washington would say, gentlemen, please stay. you did not walk out on the general. and stay for three months and finish the document. in historygreat if's is what if jefferson had been at philadelphia? it is interesting that two of america's greatest thinkers john adams and thomas jefferson were not at philadelphia. adams was the american minister to the court of st. james. jefferson the american minister to paris. jefferson made a tremendous contribution. he sent to his friend madison over 200 bucks -- books on political thought, political history. my surmise is that some of those books must have been about the
as well. the incoming freshman class for the 113th congress is in washington this week. democrats in that freshman class met with reporters today and that's one of the events we covered and you will find that in our video library at cspan .org. four bills and votes if requested coming up at 6:30 eastern. s. 1956. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 1956, an act to prohibit operators of civil aircraft of the united states from participating in the european union's emissions trading scheme, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from florida, mr. mica, and the gentleman from west virginia, mr. rahall, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from florida. mr. mica: first of all, mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on s. 19356. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mica: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker p
the way they did. host: this is the front page of "the washington times." again, and that whole story is in "the washington times." republican from washington, maine. what is your optimism level for america? caller: good morning. the day after the election, i thought it was a very sad day for our country. i am a christian. i compare the morals of the two men. i am very strong in my belief against abortion, the marriage issue. the top of the list would be the economy and the morality for my children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. i don't see this country doing better in the next four years. i fear we may slide even further backward. i'd just pray that all of our leaders, republicans and democrat, will start looking at the bible and seeing what god wants them to do and it just be better men and women. that is basically my views. happy thanksgiving to you. host: the front page of the orange county registry this morning. one gentleman here is thankful for work. family is another one. someone here is thankful that the election is over. the internet. food and xbox. family, jobs, h
, we will discuss the hispanic vote. and the washington bureau chief of ♪ host: good morning. it is friday, november 9, 2012. three days removed from winning his election. the president plans to make an address from the east room of the white house about the economy and reducing the deficit. it is a speech republicans will be watching closely coming up and to the lame-duck session. as reluctant that battle and beyond, we want to hear about your top priorities for the second term. how successful do you think he will be at addressing them? give us a call on the democratic 585-3880.- republicans 202-585-3881. independents 202-585-3882. a very good morning to you. a lot of discussion about the president's second term and what needs to be addressed and the near and long term. we want to hear from you, but we will point out a few headlines. this from "the wall street journal." also from "the washington post." the front page of the commentary section of "the washington times." also, we want to point you to the front page of the business section of "the new york times." a front-page
as washington becomes obsessed with this set of issues. the elections have consequences. at c.a.p., we have argued that the issues that are really framing the fiscal debate and fiscal cliff were ones that were litigated in the election context. the president did not have one set of conversations before november and a second set now. there was a thread going through the debate that the country was having and that thread was around having a balanced plan to address america's fiscal challenges. there are serious fiscal challenges that we do need long term -- deficit reduction -- that is important to america's credibility. it is important for america's economy and economic growth. that plan has to be balanced, and that means significant revenues and that paying has to go around. that means the wealthy and well- off have to pay their fair share as well. these should not be new issues. they are ones that were debated. they came up in every debate -- even the foreign policy debate. the american people are on the side of the president and democrats who are making this case. that is not to say that
investigates cyber-based crime, terror, and sp nine. "washington journal" is next. >> president obama has become the first sitting u.s. president to visit burma. he also visited thailand this weekend. today, cambodia, where he will attend a summit. in the meantime, back here in washington, congress takes a weeklong break for the thanksgiving holiday. they will come back as they ponder the fiscal cliff and how to avoid it this week. they will be back next week. lots more headlines and talk this weekend about the future of the republican party as it ponders itself. one headline says romney is digging a deeper hole for the party. we want to hear from republicans only for the first 45 minutes of its monday edition. what do you think the future of your party is, what do you stand for, and what should you stand for moving forward? here are the numbers -- ere's the "washington times" this morning, the governor of louisiana, bobby jindal. the talk continues in the party about what to romney has had to say about why he lost to the president. [video clip] >> first, governor romney is an honorable a
in washington. [applause] we are not going to try to transform this country into something it was never intended to be. [applause] look, i've spent four years of my live at miami of ohio. this is a good place. [applause] we know who we are. we know what we believe in. we know what made this country great. and ladies and gentlemen i am so honored. i am so proud to introduce to you the next president and first lady of the united states mitt and ann romney. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> thank you so much. thank you. thank you ohio. i know who you're here to see and she's right next to me. >> this is quite a crowd. who is going to win next tuesday? and is ohio going to do it for us? what a thrill for us to be here. what a thrill for me to stand next to the man that is going to be the next president of the united states. [applause] this is a man that will not fail. this is a man that is going to turn around america and i'm going to be so happy to be by his side when i can watch him do that. so thank you all very much. >> thank you so much. what a gathering tonight. i want to thank you for joining paul and me and ou
. turn your clocks back one hour tonight. that is it for "washington journal." a new edition comes at 7:00 tomorrow morning. >> through the election day, what our coverage of the presidential candidates and key senate and house and governor races. after an overview of the 2012 senate races, we will show you the maine senate race debate. >> a senior analyst for the rothenberg her campaign has completely retooled. she reinvents herself. she has had some good television ads. murphy is making up the advantage where it needs to be. she is open a case like, but not a huge leak that democrats would like in connecticut. -- lee that democrats would like in connecticut -- lead that democrats would like in connecticut. north dakota is an interesting one. it is one that if democrats have not gotten the right candidate, we would not be talking about it being as competitive. the democrat gets rave reviews on the trail. burke found himself under water for a bruising campaign for the house. he had to remake his image say why. he got an early -- early -- he had to remake his image state why. -- statewid
what you said is a little off from what we're hearing here in washington. >> i think there is definitely been a big focus on wireless and what the capability is. we're out there in the world today and understand that the spectrum limitations are real. engineers will tell you about that, that it just can't deliver the kind of band width that we need to really accomplish the goals that businesses and consumers want in their homes. and so what we're trying to do at the u.s.t.a. is constantly remind people without the wired network you're not going to have the wireless network. so the policy makers i think understand it better than ever that you need fiber facilities into these cell towers in order to enable them to carry broad band at faster and faster speeds which and you need better access to broad band capables in the home. >> jeff gardner is president and c.e.o. of the wind stream corporation and he is chairman of us telecom. >> we talked about universal service fund reform and one issue facing the f.c.c. right now is how to pay for this fund going forward. they took
in the senate and the way it operated. it was a magnet for a lot of us coming to washington. wandering the halls, and i did not know them all in the 1970's were madeleine albright, stephen breyer, susan collins, lamar alexander. many of the leaders. and in the media today, chris matthews, george will. many of these people got their training in the senate. we were not part of the greatest generation. we have the next best thing. we were trained by them. host: our next call for ira shapiro comes from barry. you have to turn down your set. we are getting feedback. caller: i just turned it down. this is why they had more democrats back then, because of the tea party. they made our government stagnant. they are upset about capitalism. that is what built our country. we send them a strong message. as americans, we need to back up the present by getting more involved with the senate. e-mail in your search senator, your congressman and even the president. -- e-mail your senator, the congressman, and even the president. host: we will leave it there. talk to us a little bit about what barry brought up. it
and that country's reaction to the reelection of president obama. "washington journal" next. host: good morning. live coverage of the president's remarks at arlington national cemetery. it was on this date in 1918 that hostilities ended in world war i. on this november 11, the country remembers those who lost their lives and paid the ultimate price varied at arlington national cemetery and other cemeteries around the country. for congress, it is a back to work week for the start of the lame-duck session including the ongoing debate over the fiscal cliff. grover norquist on the tax pledge will be one of the topics. we want to focus on whether you think the tax pledge is still relevant. give us a call. you can also join the conversation on our twitter page or send us an e-mail. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines. we are beginning with the front page of "the new york times." andpolitico has this story -- grover norquist is optimistic about the party being as strong as ever. he carries around copies of a map showing republican dominance all over the country. he insists the party is we
-- host: welcome to "washington journal." of the senate host: an increase in payroll taxes and the scheduled spending cuts across the board. a couple republicans yesterday signaled they could be flexible on the anti-tax pledge that they signed if it gets them closer to a deal with the white house. what is your reaction? here are the numbers to call. you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join us on facebook. you can also e-mail us. here's "usa today" looking at what happened on the sunday talk shows. it says -- the south carolina senator became the second republican senator in recent days to back away from a no tax pledge devised in the decades ago. the willingness to break ranks could prove crucial as gop leaders and democrats try to reach a deal before taxing and spending changes take effect in january. new york representative king says economic conditions have changed since the anti-tax pledge first emerged. he's a republican. that thee gop's say fiscal cliff deal is what defined grover norquist. let's hear congressman pete king of new york, a republican. he was
to washington? >> you asked if i would vote for john boehner so i don't know. i would vote for a republican speaker. let me mention since we're talking about the lack of bipartisan ship. congressman's budget which is an impressive budget it wasn't supported by his own party. so we need people that can come up with bipartisan solutions reach across the table. i'm in the center. he's so far to the left there is no coming home for him. he's not your father's democrat, he's not a john f. kennedy democrat. he's got his own agenda. >> where is the center you could shake hands with a democrat over the table? >> can i? >> yeah, which issue? >> there are plenty of issues. bringing the corporate tax rate down. i think it's a great idea that he came up with and prick supported -- president clinton supported that. >> i'm proud to have the support of president clinton who said the progressive version is the best and it was the budget that most invested in putting america back into the future business because it protects social security, medicare and makes america competitive internationally. so i think
%, that could be an important metric tuesday. host: that will do it for today's version of the "washington journal." we will see you back here tomorrow morning at 7 a.m. for "washington journal" with just three days left to the election tomorrow morning. we will take you live to the floor of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. november 2, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable frank r. wolf to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend steven willis, first baptist church in west virginia. the chaplain: let us pray. to the one who governs seas and quells the storms, we thank you for offering each life and granting hope in times of calamity. we come to you on the eve of this election seeking wisdom. for failing to take up the calls of the fatherless, we ask for mercy. for insufficiently def
veterans remembrance ceremony. >> as washington likes are against this grover norquist. they are noted for the anti-tax plans. our panel of journalists, steven sloan from politico and russell berman from "the hill" >> thank you for being here. i want to talk about your interpretation of the election and what it means for the direction of tax policy. >> we had a split decision appeared the president won by two points. he won by 7.2 years ago against a war hero. he and 9 million fewer votes. he is a lame duck now. he said he was interested in raising taxes a year from now on anyone. his physician from four years ago was that they would not raise taxes on anyone. he was very clear and no taxes if you made less than $250,000. this year august 8, he started with a new framework. my plan is that i will not raise taxes on anyone who earns less than $250,000 a year. his only promising -- he is only promising not to raise income taxes. this is not include energy taxes. is only promising to protect income taxes for one year. at the end of the year, he has promised the middle-clas
, and we will talk about the economic policy implications of where we are. >> august returns to washington next week, and now we preview the commercial agenda in the land and the relationship with president obama. panelists include a former labor secretary elaine chao and president of the center for american progress, neera tanden. this is half an hour. >> see you again. all right. jared is over there. let me just real quickly -- elaine chao, now at the heritage foundation, is a former secretary of labor. alex brill, senior fellow at the american enterprise institute. neera tanden is the president of the center for american progress, formerly chief policy adviser for hillary clinton and a 2008 and 2016 -- sorry. [laughter] jared bernstein is a senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities, former chief economic adviser to joe biden and in 2000 and 20 -- no, sorry. we should have separated you two, actually. >> today is a day for half the purpose of the families. >> -- happy progress of families. >> we have to start with the big question. obviously, we are in a position where
segment of the "washington journal." you can also contact us via social media and email. you can make a comment on our facebook page, and finally send us a tweet. here is the hill newspaper from this morning. g.o.p. forget tax rates in talks on the deficit, let's look at the spending. the speaker's swift rejection of an idea floated by representative tom cole of oklahoma, a respected party strategist and former chair of the house g.o.p. campaign committee came as the republicans voiced increasing concerns over the debate of the so-called fiscal cliff. boehner said it's time for them to get serious about the spending problem that our country has. republicans complain that for all the talk of coming up with a balanced budget plan, he has made little effort to identify specific proposals beyond increasing taxes on the wealthy. "the white house has not produced any of the balance in the president's described balance proposal that peter roscoe, the house g.o.p.'s deputy whip. boehner and the other house republican leaders will meet on thursday with treasury sec tir tim geitner and the whit
to washington and being a republican. >> the romney proposal on the individual development accounts got a lot of praise. are there areas where you could see the two parties working together? >> surem, on job training but it is not just spend more money like the jobs bill the president obama wanted which was $8 billion when he was already spending $23 billion on a program that was scattered throughout the government. there needs to be necessary reform to improve job training so that people who are unemployed can get irrelevant training and when they graduate, they can get real jobs. i actually agree -- i think divided government is an excellent opportunity to tackle the really important issues in our country. the largest issues we have are the spending. we will lose our rating once again as a nation because of our irresponsible deficit spending. if the two parties can get together because government is divided and tackle the whole issue about entitlements spending, we would be contributing a great deal to our country. >> the president expressed openness to reductions in spending with talks wit
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